Download Hiroshima – Vansonphu.com

Hiroshima On August Hiroshima was destroyed by the first atom bomb ever dropped on a city This book, John Hersey s journalistic masterpiece, tells what happened on that day Told through the memories of survivors, this timeless, powerful and compassionate document has become a classic that stirs the conscience of humanity The New York TimesAlmost four decades after the original publication of this celebrated book, John Hersey went back to Hiroshima in search of the people whose stories he had told His account of what he discovered about them is now the eloquent and moving final chapter ofHiroshima A deferential account of the Hiroshima bombing It is told through the lives of six people two Christian priests, two doctors, a mother of three and a clerk It is not sensational at all and people who have been numbed by watching too many zombie movies might not enjoy it John Hershey gives us a short account of the lives of each character and what they were doing on the morning that the bomb hit These short accounts tell us what Japanese society was like during the war The Christian priest A deferential account of the Hiroshima bombing It is told through the lives of six people two Christian priests, two doctors, a mother of three and a clerk It is not sensational at all and people who have been numbed by watching too many zombie movies might not enjoy it John Hershey gives us a short account of the lives of each character and what they were doing on the morning that the bomb hit These short accounts tell us what Japanese society was like during the war The Christian priest is terrified by the rampant xenophobia against Japanese Christians An ageing doctor who owns his own nursing home is enjoying his idyllic life in an underwear when the bomb hits He likes to drink whiskey in the evening with his friends The mother of three watches as her neighbor surrenders his house for wartime activities at the behest of the government All of them live in a constant state of anxiety because Hiroshima is one of the few places that have not been bombed Their lives are characterized by the preparations for the impending bombing Hershey s tone is measured, whether he is describing misery or bravery or hatred, almost as if he is being weighed down by some great responsibility I was not entirely convinced by his writing style I am sure this is because I am used to reading or watching sensationalistic accounts of events, because one of the reasons for reading Hiroshima is the same as why I read books about serial killers A latent sadism An eagerness to know what misery befell these victims What was it like when the atom bomb hit In August 2018, Kerala, the state in which I was born was awash after the government was forced to openthan thirty dams when their levels crossed the danger limits The state had receivedthan 40% rainfall than it usually did over a period of one month We in Kochi located in Southern Kerala , eagerly watched the news while waiting for the water to reach us False rumors spread on social media We stocked food in the book, the Christian priest helps his friend and daughter move valuable stuff to another house in case there is a bombing The restaurants began to close The water supply was cut off after one of the pumping stations got flooded My wife told me to gather certificates of my educational qualifications and proof of all our investments in a file Mrs.Nakamura, the mother of three similarly writes down account numbers of her bond investments I went out and bought two bottles of vodka because I feared they would shut down the liquor stores and I would be left dry during the Onam festival period Between August 15th and 26th, when the floods were at their worst, the Kerala State Beverages Corporation sold alcohol worth 75 million The water kept coming Refugee camps were opened I noticed the long queues and chaos in the camps when they showed pictures on TV Hershey seems to suggest that the Japanese endured the bombing with great dignity The Christian priest is struck by how there were no cries from the wounded people who had gathered in a park We talked nervously about moving to a hotel if the water reached our street India is not an ordered society like Japan Relatives living in flooded regions sent terrifying pictures and videos of flooded ground floors and old folk on terraces I was scared But there was also a sadistic aspect to this waiting for doom while being informed through social media about what it would be like The videos of water taking the roads and cars were entertaining as long as they were not mine During the annual Mumbai floods, the poor folk living in the slums would come out to the flooded roads to help stranded middle class people They did this gleefully as if they were celebrating Their glee fueled no doubt by the knowledge that things were falling apart The writer Manu Joseph described all this better than me I have seen sadists hiding in places of empathy because they need to be close to human suffering, they need to be in the best seats to watch human and animal suffering They are fascinating They themselves do believe they are good Some of the other reviews suggest that this was a terrifying book Except for a few instances in the book their faces were wholly burned, their eyesockets were hollow, the fluid from their melted eyes had run down their cheeks , I did not find it to be terrifying at all It was almost like a detached account of a terrifying event with the author only occasionally stepping in with his commentary There, in the tin factory, in the first moment of the atomic age, a human being was crushed by books. This book will 1 Make you cry A lot You will cry on your cigarette break at work so that when you go back to your desk, your coworker will see your ragged eyes and think you just got dumped over the phone or found out your cat died No, you were just reading about something roughly one googolplex worse, but you won t even bother trying to explain because your coworker couldn t give two shits about world history, and hadn t even heard about the 2011 mass murder in Oslo until you explained it t This book will 1 Make you cry A lot You will cry on your cigarette break at work so that when you go back to your desk, your coworker will see your ragged eyes and think you just got dumped over the phone or found out your cat died No, you were just reading about something roughly one googolplex worse, but you won t even bother trying to explain because your coworker couldn t give two shits about world history, and hadn t even heard about the 2011 mass murder in Oslo until you explained it to her a few weeks ago Blind, me centric America, folks Scenes from this book will return when you are stuck in traffic, and you will cry someDo not operate a motor vehicle under the influence of this book.2 Humble you Calling my problems problems is a littledifficult after reading this book, which is a high achievement in any artistic endeavor Witnessing the sober minded, empathetic will of the survivors, and the nation itself, after suffering one of the most blind, unfathomably enormous single blows dealt in all of military history really manages to put the term grace into perspective.3 Anger you Arguably the most stomach dropping scene in this two part journalistic piece is not one told from the ground where Hersey largely concentrates, but years later on a television set in America The scene featured a spot lit survivor of the atomic bomb, a minister, a man who put tireless efforts toward assisting his fellow survivors through worldwide fundraising despite the impediment of living as a hibakusha, a sufferer of the for generations felt, infinitely complex and boundless in physical manifestations, lifelong, crippling beast that is radiation sickness, a man who championed the notion that hatred of America and anger toward the attack ers is a knee jerk reaction and that it is the notion of Total War rather than that of American militarism in general or atomic warfare specifically which should be the target of emotional examination and legal action, and which should be fought against by redirecting all the power of concentrated anger rippling through Japanese society after the bombs were dropped toward the goals of peace, acceptance, and precautionary measures taken for the future of the world, a man who stood in front of the United States Senate and prayed to them for their welfare, congratulated them for their role as the leaders of Planet Earth, and thanked them for bringing peace, stability, and democracy to his nation Here this man sat, thinking he was on a local television station promoting his charity designed to raise money for female a bomb victims suffering from physically deforming keloid burn scars on their faces, as this is what he was told He was lied to, to the extent that a pre show rehearsal was conducted without his knowledge in preparation for this major television event Little did he know, he was actually on a popular television show similar to, say, Oprah or Real Time in front of millions of American viewers, stunned to find that as cameras stared at his face a face which heroically attempted but quite understandably failed to mask his sheer horrified astonishment in front of a live studio audience he was introduced to and practically forced to shake hands and have a nice little chat with the co pilot of the Enola Gay, a tears feigning man who was late and drunk during the taping because he was angry when he found out he was not receiving a big paycheck for his appearance on the show, so he just got lit and showed up all tousled and disoriented Talk about media exploitation Man, it has been a long time since I read something which disgusted me so much, and that is saying a lot Oh, I m getting flushed with anger just typing about it A lot of pathetic parading of ugly humanity happens here Prepare yourself.4 Scar the visual landscape that is your mind The imagery in this thing, as told through the recollections of 6 survivors, illustrates with emotional restraint in a dry, respectfully factual narrative account, just what an atomic bomb does to a populace Having grown up in Oklahoma City, I have seen the mind boggling destruction which results from a large, targeted bomb attack, and distinctly recall being in math class 10 miles away from ground zero, yet feeling myself shifted in my chair at the moment of explosion I remember wandering into the halls and, within twenty minutes, hearing the radio and television accounts, and witnessing students and faculty alike dropping to the ground in hysterics upon finding out that the city block or even the very building where their husband, mother, father, older brother, cousin, or best friend worked had been annihilated in a breath, those close to them incapable of knowing where they were or if they were I remember my father pulling my brother and I out of school, and taking us to witness the destruction, so massive in scope, so emotionally trying, so brain stretching and perspective building in a way which a 13 year old girl had never even thought she would be forced to face, or had even considered in her silly, pre adolescent mind Reading Hersey s piece, I remembered that time, the surreal nature and bottomless melancholy of it all, and tried to imagine it multiplied by so many times it is a number I am incapable of even estimating Hersey illustrates kimonos permanently scarring flesh with ornamental patterns, practically faceless soldiers marching with oozing eyes before dropping to their deaths, a pan of a city of moans, of pleas for assistance which are drowned out by roaring fires which consume a landscape predominantly composed of rubble, a blazing trash heap of screams, forcing people to make non stop me or them decisions, shadows burned into concrete, burial tombs uprooted, a sole doctor left to make decisions about who he can save, and who he absolutely cannot save with his limited resources, working nonstop for days and days with no food or water or sleep or even a single break There was no FEMA dropping in to assist these people There was a small handful of uninjured doctors and nurses dealing with a miles stretching feed line of wounded souls, many doomed to death before they even burrowed their way out of the wreckage Sickening.5 Terrify you Though I always try my best to keep my ear to the ground concerning current politics, particularly the seemingly endless stream of wars conducted in the name of future peace, this book perked my ears up evento the subject of nuclear warfare It s so easy to hear that a nation has or could soon have nuclear capabilities and feel only the faintest, most abstract fear at the notion It can additionally be such a distant knowledge that what was presumed to be one of the most human rights embracing nations in the world, this, my country of origin, is the only nation in the world throughout all of history to have made the decision to unleash such massive rage and suffering against fellow human beings in pursuit of dominance and stability This supposedly great nation conducted this and one other mission, permanently damaging the genetic makeup of thousands upon thousands of people, and it terrifies me about what s to come This book terrified me It seems almost indecent to put a rating on this book, I feel as if I am giving all these poor people s horrific suffering an excellent Yet this is a very powerful book, told in a matter of fact, reporting tone and it is an account that puts a human face to this devastation By following certain survivors we come to see and in my case to care greatly about these poor people How much suffering and horror this bomb caused, on innocent people at the mercy of their emperor s decisions People like It seems almost indecent to put a rating on this book, I feel as if I am giving all these poor people s horrific suffering an excellent Yet this is a very powerful book, told in a matter of fact, reporting tone and it is an account that puts a human face to this devastation By following certain survivors we come to see and in my case to care greatly about these poor people How much suffering and horror this bomb caused, on innocent people at the mercy of their emperor s decisions People like you and I just trying to live their lives, feed their children, take care of their families Not knowing what happened, what type of new weapon caused this total devastation A young doctor, one of the few available in the immediate aftermath, who tries to take care of those he can with very few supplies and with only one hour of sleep in three days Another man who brings water to those who need it and tries to save as many as he can A young woman holding a dead baby for over four days, waiting for her husband to be found so he can say goodbye So much anguish, so much heartbreak My husband s uncle was the load master for the Enola Gay, the bomber for this terrible act He suffered from depression for the rest of his life Why do these terrible things happen and why do they still continue today Haunting Gut wrenching.Utterly shame enducing.In Hiroshima Hersey has cobbled together the tales of a handful of survivors and woven them effortlessly through his narrative to create a spellbinding history lesson not to be forgotten The engrossing eye witness stories are horrifying, too real, and charged with emotion and drama without the least bit of induced melodrama There s no need Hiroshima shows that truth is farterrible than fiction.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *