{Free Best} The Folklore of Discworld Author Terry Pratchett – Vansonphu.com

The Folklore of Discworld This could also be titled Folklore AND the Discworld.Sir Terry Pratchett teams up with folklorist Jacqueline Simpson I want to be known as a folklorist maybe that can be my new introduction please meet the imminent folklorist Lyn to describe how folklore on the Discworld and on Earth have influenced each other.Like shadows of the multiverse crossing lines, folk tales and folk stories on each world have come to be as an amalgam of myth, legend, popular stories, tall tales, bold faced lies This could also be titled Folklore AND the Discworld.Sir Terry Pratchett teams up with folklorist Jacqueline Simpson I want to be known as a folklorist maybe that can be my new introduction please meet the imminent folklorist Lyn to describe how folklore on the Discworld and on Earth have influenced each other.Like shadows of the multiverse crossing lines, folk tales and folk stories on each world have come to be as an amalgam of myth, legend, popular stories, tall tales, bold faced lies and some truth mixed in Pratchett and Simpson work well together and while this is mainly about revisiting and explaining Pratchett s magnificent creation of the Discworld, this is also a fun and instructive guide to how some of Earth s myths and legend have come to be and also, interestingly, how some tales have evolved over time.Probably mainly for Discworld fans ubiquitous references to just about all of the novels and stories might lose some non Discworld travelers this is also a good book to learn about Earth folklore This is really a 3.5, but I m rounding up If you have read the Discworld novels and have a good working knowledge of folk and fairy tales much of this book isn t anything new Undoubtably, you made the connections yourself There are some interesting tidbits, like the ballad about the dragon who was killed by a kick up the rump must track that down however, most of the information isn t really new It isn t presented dully It is an interesting book to read because of Pratchett s style yes This is really a 3.5, but I m rounding up If you have read the Discworld novels and have a good working knowledge of folk and fairy tales much of this book isn t anything new Undoubtably, you made the connections yourself There are some interesting tidbits, like the ballad about the dragon who was killed by a kick up the rump must track that down however, most of the information isn t really new It isn t presented dully It is an interesting book to read because of Pratchett s style yes, there are footnotes as well as the bibliography at the back You also get an idea of how Pratchett s mind works I did wonder, however, why in the discussion of chests used as murder weapons a.k.a the Luggage why the Grimms The Juniper Tree and the Italian version Cat Cinderella were left out I wavered between 3 4 stars on this one, but I m nothing if not a bit generous when it deserves it.My main concern was that this was another book cashing in on the huge popularity of Pratchett, and it is, but it didn t dim my enjoyment.I love folklore and myth and this one is full of a bunch of mirroring of both, breaking down examples of how Pratchett twists and captures the spirit of so many legends mostly English or within that scope, which is also large Is it good Sure, if you like a I wavered between 3 4 stars on this one, but I m nothing if not a bit generous when it deserves it.My main concern was that this was another book cashing in on the huge popularity of Pratchett, and it is, but it didn t dim my enjoyment.I love folklore and myth and this one is full of a bunch of mirroring of both, breaking down examples of how Pratchett twists and captures the spirit of so many legends mostly English or within that scope, which is also large Is it good Sure, if you like a refresher on myth andlocal sources of custom, magical thinking, and fairy tales I do And so I thought it was quite good I did learn a few new things, too, but mostly it was comparative religion and callbacks to the standards Not bad, but it still reads like a popular literary analysis textbook Do I recommend it Absolutely, if you re a huge fan of Pratchett Gives you a new dimension with which to read the books I ve read a few of the non fiction books associated with Terry Pratchett s Discworld books but somehow missed this one when it first came out, which is a pity because I have an interest in mythology and folklore.The book itself is lightweight and doesn t really add that much to knowledge of either Earth or Discworld folklore, it is just a simple comparison between the two worlds and notes where there are similarities Where it does have a lot of relevance is the way in which Terry Pratchett meti I ve read a few of the non fiction books associated with Terry Pratchett s Discworld books but somehow missed this one when it first came out, which is a pity because I have an interest in mythology and folklore.The book itself is lightweight and doesn t really add that much to knowledge of either Earth or Discworld folklore, it is just a simple comparison between the two worlds and notes where there are similarities Where it does have a lot of relevance is the way in which Terry Pratchett meticulously sifted through Earth mythology in order to come up with the inspiration for his ideas into the Discworld, but also twisting it just enough to make it new and different Any fantasy writer would do well to read this book as a how to guide for creating a comprehensive and realistic background for their own stories Many fantasy worlds fail because the author hasn t done their research properly it may be fantasy, but it still has to be grounded in something we recognise It would certainly be easier to read this book than The Golden Bough, or Hero of a Thousand Faces both of which I have found too hard to get into.I also found this book interesting because it reminded me just how much detail of the Discworld books I have forgotten over the years, even though I have retained the general gist of each story That reminds me that I really must start rereading this series in the near future.3 1 2 stars I m a fan of both Terry Pratchett and folklore I definitely learnt some things, but also knew quite a lot of it already, which perhaps reflects the four star rating rather than the five one might otherwise expect given my stated interests You don t need to have read all the discworld novels to get this book, but you do need to be a discworld reader or a large chunk of it will be lost on you This book is a reference list that explains how earth s folklore primarily British, but not exclusivel I m a fan of both Terry Pratchett and folklore I definitely learnt some things, but also knew quite a lot of it already, which perhaps reflects the four star rating rather than the five one might otherwise expect given my stated interests You don t need to have read all the discworld novels to get this book, but you do need to be a discworld reader or a large chunk of it will be lost on you This book is a reference list that explains how earth s folklore primarily British, but not exclusively so has influenced the stories, and it comes with a really good index at the back So you could have it on the side when reading through the various discworld books to look up the bits you weren t sure of However, it works best on the novels set outside Ankh Morpork From memory the most referenced are Pyramids, Sourcery, Hogfather, Lords and Ladies, Soul Music, Monstrous Regiment and the Tiffany Aching books Another word on spoilers Although there are a good number of quoted sections and explanations of references I don t think any of these directly related to the main plots of the stories However, you might want to read the actual Discworld books before reading this one You ll enjoy it all thefor being familiar with the stories This book was a little bit of a mixed bag if you re familiar with Pratchett s Discworld novels, a lot of this will not be new and the extensive quotations might irritate you after a while they did me If you aren t familiar with Discworld, I can t imagine this book making much sense However, the comic ways in which Pratchett riffs on Earth folklore, mythology and urban legends are explained well, and the style is very amusing I guess I was looking for something a littledense, especial This book was a little bit of a mixed bag if you re familiar with Pratchett s Discworld novels, a lot of this will not be new and the extensive quotations might irritate you after a while they did me If you aren t familiar with Discworld, I can t imagine this book making much sense However, the comic ways in which Pratchett riffs on Earth folklore, mythology and urban legends are explained well, and the style is very amusing I guess I was looking for something a littledense, especially at this length, but the book was still fun Discworld companion for the die hard fans Particularly useful for the non British readers who are not so familiar with the British traditions and might have missed some of the customs referred to in the series Unfortunately, Pratchett s involvement in this book is limited to extracts from his books. It would be impossible not to give this five stars It is so muchthan just a look at the folklore behind Pratchett s Discworld series, as with his Science of Discworld books it is also a detailed look at the folklore of our world, both obvious and obscure and stretching back some 4500 years, but unlike those books which sort of follow a new narrative line The Folklore of Discworld acts as a greatest hits of around 40 of his books with quotes and passages littered throughout the text to ill It would be impossible not to give this five stars It is so muchthan just a look at the folklore behind Pratchett s Discworld series, as with his Science of Discworld books it is also a detailed look at the folklore of our world, both obvious and obscure and stretching back some 4500 years, but unlike those books which sort of follow a new narrative line The Folklore of Discworld acts as a greatest hits of around 40 of his books with quotes and passages littered throughout the text to illustrate his comments which just serves to remind the reader just how good these books are That it should be a reminder is important because this is not a greatest hits as a musician might produce which can be used as a gateway to their works for a new audience, here the value of the text is to remind you of the bits you enjoyed first time round while at the same time pointing out some of the references that you might have missed.The book is co authored by Jacqueline Simpson who brings a lifetime of knowledge around Earthly folklore to counterbalance the Discworld equivalent Simpson makes a good point in her introduction that she felt that the book might take too much away from people s enjoyment of the series and this again may be true for someone who hasn t read the majority of the books but for someone who has the joy is in recognising the references that you spotted while happily having those that you didn t pointed out to you.One thing I know for sure is that I ll never look at a magpie in the same way again Terry Pratchett joins up with a leading folklorist to reveal the legends, myths and customs of Discworld, together with helpful hints from Planet EarthMost of us grew up having always known when to touch wood or cross our fingers, and what happens when a princess kisses a frog or a boy pulls a sword from a stone, yet sadly some of these things are beginning to be forgotten Legends, myths, and fairy tales our world is made up of the stories we told ourselves about where we came from and how we got here It is the same on Discworld, except that beings, which on Earth are creatures of the imagination like vampires, trolls, witches and, possibly, gods are real, alive and, in some cases kicking, on the DiscIn The Folklore of Discworld, Terry Pratchett teams up with leading British folklorist Jacqueline Simpson to take an irreverent yet illuminating look at the living myths and folklore that are reflected, celebrated and affectionately libelled in the uniquely imaginative universe of Discworld I love Sir Terry Pratchett s work and I am very interested in folklore, so this book hit all the right buttons Sir Terry and Jacqueline Simpson have written an interesting, fun, and informative text which tells of the myth, legends, and lore that inform the Discworld series No dry, dull scholarly work here, oh no The usual wit and levity Sir Terry brings to his fiction is reflected in this volume, enhanced by Simpson s expert knowledge of her field A jolly good read I love Sir Terry Pratchett s work and I am very interested in folklore, so this book hit all the right buttons Sir Terry and Jacqueline Simpson have written an interesting, fun, and informative text which tells of the myth, legends, and lore that inform the Discworld series No dry, dull scholarly work here, oh no The usual wit and levity Sir Terry brings to his fiction is reflected in this volume, enhanced by Simpson s expert knowledge of her field A jolly good read

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